Blue is the Warmest Color


blue-is-the-warmest-color-posterBlue is the Warmest Color. (“The Life of Adèle – Chapters 1 & 2)

Review by Lucía Santiago Dantés.

Blue is the warmest color, proved to be a very controversial film, although it won the prestigious Palme D’or at Cannes this year, it also was the center of discussion due to its long sexual scenes which makes you doubt about Abdellatif Kechiche’s intentions of telling a story of just making another “artistic” soft porn film.

So, what’s the story about? The film recollects the story of Adèle, a young woman who falls in love with another girl literally out of the blue. It is based on a comic or graphic novel called “Blue Angel”. A woman who falls in love with another woman and then loses her, or should I say it’s the old cliché for every single Hollywood flick (plus some porn added)? But a la inverse: boy meets girl becomes girl meets girl, boy loses girl is now girl loses girl although it lacks the grand finale: boy gets back girl (No wonder the writer of the comic novel was upset about it). The twist of the story seems to be enough to win at Cannes not only for director Abdellatif Kechiche as this is the first time the coveted award was given to Kechiche, Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux the protagonists of the story. Not without raising some eyebrows here and there.

Let’s analyze the story. Blue is the warmest color focuses on Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos) and it is seen on her point of view. In Adèle we see someone who is in an honest way, trying to find herself. She is a teenager at the time, doing what youngsters do: going to school, dating, eating, sleeping and f***ing (let’s be honest about it). Until one day, Adèle bumps into a girl with blue hair just across the street: Emma (Léa Seydoux). Adèle desires her since the first moment. We could say it was love at first sight for both of them. We see Adèle do whatever other girl with a crush would do: look for the love interest. And so she goes on a quest to find her on the night gay clubs. And they meet. Both begin a friendship that upsets Adèle’s friends on a very crude homophobic scene. They keep their friendship and soon they become a couple. It is said that opposites attract and that was the main problem with this relationship. Their personas are so different. Adele is humble and simple minded she doesn’t have high expectations about life; while Emma is all about the artist’s bs: high expectations, playing the hard game, but most important, as egocentric as an artist is, she feels the need to be surrounded by artists like her. After the honeymoon of all relationships Emma starts asking Adele about doing something more important with her life, like writing a book. Adele doesn’t care. She feels good working as a kinder garden teacher. As time pass, Emma seems to be interested in someone else and Adele finds herself jealous and desperate so she fools around with a coworker. The rest, you can watch it.

Now that you are familiar with the story you can see that there’s more than just a sex scene in that film. It is a true love story but also it is the story of a woman who in order to become, she has to lose herself and then get herself back.

The only criticism that it was made is of course the sex scenes, and it is not because people may get offended but the question is raised: was it necessary? Kechiche justified himself in the good old cliché “it was necessary to tell the story” as we are telling a story of someone who is trying to have a non heterosexual relationship. But the question raises: did it need it to be that explicit? Did it have to be that long? At some point it becomes uncomfortable to watch, its just too explicit, also the film length could have use a good trimming in the editing room and reduce that three unnecessary hours to tell the same story. Was is good enough to become a winner at Cannes? Depends as usually in watching the other films and it is totally subjective to the jugdes. Strip the intense scenes that gave them the NC17 rating and you’ll see what I mean. I guess from now that has the coveted award on it’s all about audiences (snobby, porn lovers, guys with the “girl on girl” thing) that goes to see the film for the wrong reasons rather than the interesting story that it is.

Did you know that in the original story “Blue Angel” Adele dies? Yes, there are certain differences. For example, Adele’s character in the comic is called Clementine, and the whole story is after Clementine’s passing and Emma receives her diary. In a way, she becomes the writer Emma expected her to be. Also talking about writers, Julie Margoh, author of the comic “Le Bleu Est une Couleur Chaude,” also criticized Kechiche and the film as she expressed on a communiqué translated to English on her blog:

On her thoughts as a lesbian she said:

“This was what was missing on the set: lesbians,”

I don’t know the sources of information for the director and the actresses (who are all straight, unless proven otherwise) and I was never consulted upstream. Maybe there was someone there to awkwardly imitate the possible positions with their nads and/or to show the some porn of so-called “lesbians” (unfortunately it’s hardly ever actually for a lesbian audience) Because –except for a few passages,  -this is all that it brings to my mind: a brutal and surgical display, exuberant and cold, of so-called lesbian sex, which turned into porn, and made me feel very ill at ease” Especially when in the middle of a movie theatre everyone was giggling. The heteronormative laughed because they don’t understand it and find the scene ridiculous. The gay and queer people laughed because it’s not convincing at all, and find the scene ridiculous, and among the only people we didn’t hear giggling were the guys too busy feasting their eyes on an incarnation of their fantasies on screen.”

And with those words I rest my case.

But don’t get me wrong. The film is good and also important as it comes sociologically speaking in the context of gay relationships are more accepted nowadays and gay marriage is a reality. It is the the film that marks the new millennium way of thinking.  But also it is deplorable how Kechiche treats the writer of the story. And for that you have to read the entire interview. And come up with your thoughts. As for me, the director did what any other Hollywood film director would do: take the story and get rid of the writer.

If you want to read the entire post please follow this link.

http://sd-4.archive-host.com/membres/up/204771422545612119/Adele_blue.pdf

For Julie Maroh’s blog please go to this link

http://www.juliemaroh.com

blue-is-the-warmest-color-posterBlue is the Warmest Color. (“The Life of Adèle – Chapters 1 & 2)

Review by Lucía Santiago Dantés.

Blue is the warmest color, proved to be a very controversial film, although it won the prestigious Palme D’or at Cannes this year, it also was the center of discussion due to its long sexual scenes which makes you doubt about Abdellatif Kechiche’s intentions of telling a story of just making another “artistic” soft porn film.

So, what’s the story about? The film recollects the story of Adèle, a young woman who falls in love with another girl literally out of the blue. It is based on a comic or graphic novel called “Blue Angel”. A woman who falls in love with another woman and then loses her, or should I say it’s the old cliché for every single Hollywood flick (plus some porn added)? But a la inverse: boy meets girl becomes girl meets girl, boy loses girl is now girl loses girl although it lacks the grand finale: boy gets back girl (No wonder the writer of the comic novel was upset about it). The twist of the story seems to be enough to win at Cannes not only for director Abdellatif Kechiche as this is the first time the coveted award was given to Kechiche, Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux the protagonists of the story. Not without raising some eyebrows here and there.

Let’s analyze the story. Blue is the warmest color focuses on Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos) and it is seen on her point of view. In Adèle we see someone who is in an honest way, trying to find herself. She is a teenager at the time, doing what youngsters do: going to school, dating, eating, sleeping and f***ing (let’s be honest about it). Until one day, Adèle bumps into a girl with blue hair just across the street: Emma (Léa Seydoux). Adèle desires her since the first moment. We could say it was love at first sight for both of them. We see Adèle do whatever other girl with a crush would do: look for the love interest. And so she goes on a quest to find her on the night gay clubs. And they meet. Both begin a friendship that upsets Adèle’s friends on a very crude homophobic scene. They keep their friendship and soon they become a couple. It is said that opposites attract and that was the main problem with this relationship. Their personas are so different. Adele is humble and simple minded she doesn’t have high expectations about life; while Emma is all about the artist’s bs: high expectations, playing the hard game, but most important, as egocentric as an artist is, she feels the need to be surrounded by artists like her. After the honeymoon of all relationships Emma starts asking Adele about doing something more important with her life, like writing a book. Adele doesn’t care. She feels good working as a kinder garden teacher. As time pass, Emma seems to be interested in someone else and Adele finds herself jealous and desperate so she fools around with a coworker. The rest, you can watch it.

Now that you are familiar with the story you can see that there’s more than just a sex scene in that film. It is a true love story but also it is the story of a woman who in order to become, she has to lose herself and then get herself back.

The only criticism that it was made is of course the sex scenes, and it is not because people may get offended but the question is raised: was it necessary? Kechiche justified himself in the good old cliché “it was necessary to tell the story” as we are telling a story of someone who is trying to have a non heterosexual relationship. But the question raises: did it need it to be that explicit? Did it have to be that long? At some point it becomes uncomfortable to watch, its just too explicit, also the film length could have use a good trimming in the editing room and reduce that three unnecessary hours to tell the same story. Was is good enough to become a winner at Cannes? Depends as usually in watching the other films and it is totally subjective to the jugdes. Strip the intense scenes that gave them the NC17 rating and you’ll see what I mean. I guess from now that has the coveted award on it’s all about audiences (snobby, porn lovers, guys with the “girl on girl” thing) that goes to see the film for the wrong reasons rather than the interesting story that it is.

Did you know that in the original story “Blue Angel” Adele dies? Yes, there are certain differences. For example, Adele’s character in the comic is called Clementine, and the whole story is after Clementine’s passing and Emma receives her diary. In a way, she becomes the writer Emma expected her to be. Also talking about writers, Julie Margoh, author of the comic “Le Bleu Est une Couleur Chaude,” also criticized Kechiche and the film as she expressed on a communiqué translated to English on her blog:

On her thoughts as a lesbian she said:

“This was what was missing on the set: lesbians,”

I don’t know the sources of information for the director and the actresses (who are all straight, unless proven otherwise) and I was never consulted upstream. Maybe there was someone there to awkwardly imitate the possible positions with their nads and/or to show the some porn of so-called “lesbians” (unfortunately it’s hardly ever actually for a lesbian audience) Because –except for a few passages, -this is all that it brings to my mind: a brutal and surgical display, exuberant and cold, of so-called lesbian sex, which turned into porn, and made me feel very ill at ease” Especially when in the middle of a movie theatre everyone was giggling. The heteronormative laughed because they don’t understand it and find the scene ridiculous. The gay and queer people laughed because it’s not convincing at all, and find the scene ridiculous, and among the only people we didn’t hear giggling were the guys too busy feasting their eyes on an incarnation of their fantasies on screen.”

And with those words I rest my case.

But don’t get me wrong. The film is good and also important as it comes sociologically speaking in the context of gay relationships are more accepted nowadays and gay marriage is a reality. It is the the film that marks the new millennium way of thinking. But also it is deplorable how Kechiche treats the writer of the story. And for that you have to read the entire interview. And come up with your thoughts. As for me, the director did what any other Hollywood film director would do: take the story and get rid of the writer.

If you want to read the entire post please follow this link.

http://sd-4.archive-host.com/membres/up/204771422545612119/Adele_blue.pdf

For Julie Maroh’s blog please go to this link

http://www.juliemaroh.com

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